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Helping You Be a Better Dentist

Can I wear a short-sleeve lab jacket when it’s hot?

ADA Professional Product ReviewThe ADA Professional Product Review is like no other dental product publication because it bases evaluations on comparative testing in the ADA Laboratory, in clinical settings with dental schools and through other collaborations. It’s content you can use, free from outside influence, and it’s available to members online.

Check out the April 2014 issue (PDF link) where you’ll not only find the answer to the headline question (plus find out what OSHA has to say about scrubs) but you’ll also find in-depth information about:

  • Surface Disinfectants: What dentists and their staff need to know
  • Disease Transmission Through Dental Unit Water: An Update
  • A Laboratory Evaluation of Electric Handpiece Temperature and the Associated Risk of Burns
  • Dental Electronic Health Records Systems

Bonus: if you have a question about appropriate dental practice attire or anything else dental science-related, send it to science@ada.org and perhaps your question will appear in a future issue of ADA Professional Product Review.

Take your knowledge of evidence-based dentistry to the next level

ADA Headquarters BuildingThe EBD Champions Conference 2.0: Implementing Science in Practice happens May 9-10 at ADA headquarters in Chicago. Steven Novella, M.D., assistant professor of neurology at Yale University School of Medicine and host of The Skeptics’ Guide to the Universe, will explore the question, Why is Science-Based Medicine Important? in his keynote address.

The registration fee is $150 for ADA members and $225 for non-members. Visit ADA.org/EBDconference for more information and to register by March 31.

The conference is supported by a contribution from Procter & Gamble Professional Oral Health.

Let us now consider dental patient napkin holders

open mouthDental patient napkins used during routine dental procedures are often disposable, but napkin holders typically are reusable, although they can be tough to disinfect.

There are both disposable napkin holders and disposable napkins that don’t require a separate holder on the market. Dentists need to make informed decisions on whether to use disposable or reusable products for patient protection in their practices.

The ADA Professional Product Review analyzed six disposable products and compared them to reusable products. Each product was evaluated using seven criteria including ease of use and moisture protection.

Considering disposables? You might be surprised to find out what the evaluators had to say!

ADA members have access to the full online archives of The ADA Professional Product Review. From digital radiography systems to water quality monitoring kits, find the complete resources to help you make informed decisions about professional products.

What do the Birthday Rule, Malocclusion and Xerostomia have in Common?

Birthday CandlesThey are all terms found on the Glossary of Dental Clinical and Administrative Terms. There are many terms used daily by dentists and their teams in the course of delivering care to patients, maintaining patient records and preparing claims. New dentists and new team members may not be as familiar with some terms. From abscess to zygomatic bone, the Glossary has the definitions to get everyone up to speed and on the same page.

Questions? ADA members can call the number shown on your ADA member card, or send an email to dentalcode@ada.org.

Registration is open for the New Dentist Conference!

Join us for the ADA 28th New Dentist Conference taking place in Kansas City, Missouri July 17-19, 2014 at Sheraton Kansas City Hotel at Crown Center. Registration is now open!

In addition to a full day of leadership development, the Conference includes:

  • Hands-on endodontic and implant CE courses at UMKC School of Dentistry
  • Friday night social event at PBR Big Sky in the city’s Power & Light District
  • Breakfast-and-learn sessions; all-inclusive lunches

…and more! CE courses are available on a first-come, first-served basis so register today to ensure you get the schedule you want. We’ll see you in Kansas City!

Visit Chicago and be a Champion for Evidence-Based Dentistry

ADA Headquarters BuildingEvidence-based dentistry (EBD) is based on three important domains: the best available scientific evidence, a dentist’s clinical skill and judgment, and each individual patient’s needs and preferences

EBD Champions 2.0: Implementing Science in Practice, taking place May 9-10 at ADA Headquarters in Chicago, will build on your existing EBD skills and take you to a new level in the dissemination and implementation of scientific research.

Favorite EBD speakers Janet Clarkson, Dental Health Research Unit University of Dundee, and Bob Weyant, University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine, return in 2014 to discuss:

  • dissemination and implementation research
  • evidence-based clinical treatment and outcomes
  • behavioral change of practitioners

Information about the complete curriculum and new speakers is coming soon. Participants will receive 10 hours of continuing education credit. The registration fee is $150 for ADA members and $225 for non-members.

For more information contact ebd@ada.org. And be sure to check out the ADA Center for Evidence-Based Dentistry where you’ll find on-demand access to systematic reviews, summaries and clinical recommendations that translate the latest scholarly findings into a user-friendly format.

Save the Fairy Tale Kingdom with your Toothbrush!

The American Dental Association is proud to be one of the founding members of the Ad Council’s Partnership for Healthy Mouths, Healthy Lives. As part of its successful Kids’ Healthy Mouths campaign, the Partnership recently released Toothsavers, a new, free mobile gaming app. This interactive game encourages kids to save friendly fairy tale characters from the evil, cavity-creating sorceress who cast a wicked, tooth-rotting spell on the kingdom. The goal of the game is to motivate children to save their own teeth by brushing their teeth two minutes, twice a day.

Here’s how you can help spread the word:

Share this game with your patients to motivate parents to take action to reduce their children’s risk of oral disease by making sure their kids are brushing their teeth for two minutes, twice a day.

For the Patient — Keeping Medicine Safely in the Home

prescription drugsThe statistics are frightening — according to the Centers for Disease Control, more than 60,000 children end up in emergency rooms each year because they got into medicines while their caregiver wasn’t looking. And a 2011 survey by the Partnership at Drugfree.org (PDF Link) found that almost one-in-five teenagers reported that they had abused prescription drugs at least once.

The January 2014 issue of the Journal of the American Dental Association (JADA) includes a fact sheet for you to share with patients about keeping medicine safely in the home.

The article includes suggestions for safety in the home — one suggestion is to program the poison control number (800.222.1222) into your phone’s contact list. The article also includes suggestions for keeping medicine from being abused, including keeping track of the amount of medicine that should be in a bottle.

Unlike other portions of JADA, the print version of this page may be clipped and photocopied as a handout for patients without reprint permission from the ADA Publishing Division.

Peer Review Resources from the ADA

open mouthThe peer review system is a voluntary process for resolving disputes between a patient and a dentist outside of a legal venue or the “court of public opinion.” The ADA promotes peer review as an option to the public at MouthHealthy.org, and dentists may encourage dissatisfied patients to consider initiating the process as a way of settling a disagreement.

Access the complete range of ADA peer review resources online at ADA.org.

What to do when Delegating Goes Wrong

NegotiationWhen we talk with new dentists, one challenge comes up frequently — the difficulty in getting comfortable with delegating. But whether you own a practice or work for one, there is simply no way to do it all yourself.

Over at the HBR blog, Elizabeth Grace Saunders has a series of suggestions for how to delegate effectively. Here’s a tip that caught our attention:

Once you start to let go of control, inevitably there will be a time when something doesn’t get done in the way that you would prefer. Your gut reaction will lead you to blame yourself for letting go — “Why did I ever let anyone else do this?” – which typically manifests on the surface as anger toward or frustration with others. But instead of immediately putting the work back on your agenda, transform this situation into an opportunity for learning. First, evaluate whether you could do anything differently in the future. Second, help the people who did the work understand what they need to know to complete the work successfully next time. Often you don’t know what went wrong until you really dig in.

What is your best advice for someone new to delegating tasks? Share your answers in the comments.