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Mentoring

ADA accepting applications for Investigators in Dental Informatics Award

The American Dental Association is accepting applications for the 2015 Robert H. Ahlstrom New Investigator Award, created to encourage interest in dental informatics standards among dental students, new dentists and dentists pursuing post-doctoral studies.

Applications are due Feb. 1, 2015, and a recipient will be selected in May 2015.

The recipient of the 2015 Robert H. Ahlstrom New Investigator Award will receive airfare and accommodations to present the winning project in November 2015 at the ADA Standards Committee on Dental Informatics (SCDI) annual meeting in Washington, D.C.

Dr. Robert Ahlstrom

Dr. Robert Ahlstrom

Through the Ahlstrom Award, the ADA aims to highlight the crucial role that dental informatics standards play in improving the quality of patient care, assuring patient health and safety and increasing efficiency through use of information technology.

The ADA defines informatics as the health information technology discipline that makes appropriate health information available as needed to authorized users with the assurance of confidentiality safeguards. The goal of the ADA SCDI is to help dentists streamline and empower their practices through the use of information technology. The SCDI develops standards for choosing the hardware, software and digital imaging solutions to create a fully computerized practice.

As the first chairman of the ADA Standards Committee on Dental Informatics, which was formed in 1999, Dr. Ahlstrom brought together dental informatics experts from across the dental profession, representing dentists, government, academia, and industry. He led the group’s successful efforts to develop standards for information exchange, clinical informatics systems and knowledge management. Dr. Ahlstrom served as chairman of the SCDI until 2006.

For application materials for the Robert H. Ahlstrom New Investigator Award, including specific submission requirements for eligibility, and more information about the ADA Standards Programs, please visit ADA.org/dentalstandards.

Get Involved!

Decisions made today may be affecting new dentists and their patients for the next 30 to 40 years.

New dentists everywhere are making their voices heard in the development of policies and programs through involvement in state and local new dentist committees. These committees advocate for the needs, interests and concerns of new dentists. Volunteer leaders help new dentists transition to and succeed in practice as well as develop and offer continuing education, networking opportunities and leadership development.

To get involved with your new dentist committee, contact your state or local dental society, the ADA New Dentist Committee at newdentist@ada.org or 1-312-440-2779.

Have you ever thought about academic dentistry?

For dentists just beginning their dental career, there are a number of opportunities today for volunteer, part-time and full-time opportunities in dental academics.

Dentists seeking information on academic dentistry may find answers from various resources, including TeachDentistry.org, a website developed by faculty at the Columbia University College of Dental Medicine, and a program during ADA 2014 — America’s Dental Meeting in San Antonio.

Any practitioner who is curious about teaching is encouraged to go on the website to answer their questions about teaching and seriously consider contributing to the next generation of colleagues, said Dr. Burton Edelstein, a professor of dental medicine at Columbia University.

In addition, if you are attending ADA 2014 — America’s Dental Meeting in San Antonio, you may be interested in the Saturday, Oct. 11, program titled “Transitioning from Practice to Dental Education.”  To register, click here.

ADA 2014 logoThe program is an opportunity to learn about moving from a career in dental practice to a career in dental education. The program presents a picture of all aspects of academic life, its advantages and disadvantages and its opportunities and challenges.

Three experienced dental educators will present practical information regarding applying for and obtaining an academic appointment: Dr. John N. Williams Jr., dean, Indiana University School of Dentistry; Dr. Diane C. Hoelscher, chair, Department of Patient Management at the University of Detroit Mercy School of Dentistry; and Dr. Brad J. Potter, senior associate dean for academic affairs, University of Colorado School of Dental Medicine.

Institute for Diversity in Leadership 2014-15 class

Institute for Diversity in Leadership 2014-15 class

Class of 2014-15: From left to right (front row) Drs. Robin Nguyen, Trinity, Fla.; Carliza Marcos, San Carlos, Calif.; Xochitl Anderton, Lubbock, Texas; Amanda Hemmer, Phoenizville, Pa.; Christina Meiners, San Antonio; Zellisha Quam, Albuquerque, N.M.; (center row) Drs. Rico Short, Smyrma, Ga.; Mark Limosani, Weston, Fla.; Malieka Johnson, San Diego; Abe Abdulwaheed, Cambridge, Mass.; (back row) Drs. Inna Piskorska, San Antonio; Kevin Bolden, Waco, Texas; Deryck Pham, Mays Landing, N.J.; Darwin Hayes, Bronx, N.Y.; Paul Hsiao, Fresno, Calif.; Shane Murphy, Anchorage, Alaska.

The 16 members of the Institute for Diversity in Leadership 2014-15 class, which includes several new dentists, attended their first session at ADA Headquarters today.

The class members are Drs. Abdullaibrahim Abdulwaheed, Cambridge Massachusetts; Xochitl Anderson, Lubbock, Texas; Kevin Bolden, Waco, Texas; Darwin Hayes, Bronx, New York; Amanda Hemmer, Phoenixville, Pennsylvania; Shih-Yen Hsiao, Fresno, California; Malieka Johnson, San Diego, California; Mark Limosani, Weston, Florida; Carliza Marcos, San Carlos, California; Christina Meiners, San Antonio, Texas; Shane Murphy, Anchorage, Alaska; Robin Nguyen, Trinity, Florida; Deryck Pham, Mays Landing, New Jersey; Inna Piskorska, San Antonio, Texas; Zellisha Quam, Albuquerque, New Mexico; and Rico Short, Smyrna, Georgia.

The Institute provides a diverse group of dentists with education and experience to build a lifetime of relationships and set new leadership paths within the dental profession and their community. Core to the program’s philosophy is that lasting leadership learning is lifelong and based on experience.

As a key part of the leadership learning experience, each participant also designs and completes a personal leadership project for their community or the profession.

In addition to this week’s session, the 2014-15 class will attend two other sessions: Dec. 8-9 and Sept. 10-11, 2015. Students will work with leading educators from Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management and Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business during three sessions. The ADA thanks Henry Schein and Procter & Gamble for their continued support of the Institute for Diversity in Leadership.

For more information on the Institute, visit ADA.org/diversityinstitute.

UIC dental students seek ‘Success’ at ADA Headquarters

SuccessMore than 50 University of Illinois-Chicago first-year dental students visited the ADA Headquarters Monday, Aug. 18 for a Success Dental Student Program and a building tour.

The students received an overview on career opportunities, stress management and financial management from Dr. Tom Sullivan, ADA Success speaker. In addition, the Illinois State Dental Society provided an overview on the value of getting involved in organized dentistry.

Also that same day, third- and fourth-year students received an ADA Success program presentation from Dr. Eric Childs, New Dentist Committee member, at the UIC College of Dentistry.

The Success Dental Student Programs provide the next generation dentists with ethical and practice management information and valuable ADA resources for the transition from dental school to dental practice. For more information on the programs, click here.

In a Time of Change Find out Why Things are Going So Well

Leading a group at a dry erase boardSometimes it seems we’re wired to correct the negative. So when it comes to making a change, we’ll wonder, “What is the problem and how shall I fix it?”

Author Dan Heath suggests that this approach probably works fine most of the time — if your kid has a single F on his report card, by all means focus on that problem. However in a post on the Fast Company blog, Heath suggests it isn’t always wise to focus on problems:

There’s one time in life when this problem-focus backfires on us, and that’s when we’re trying to change things. In times of change, our report card doesn’t look almost-perfect. It looks mixed. Parts of it look like a failure. And if, in those times, we slip into problem-solving mode, we’ll spin our wheels, because there are problems everywhere. That’s a recipe for inaction, for paralysis.

What’s the answer? Instead of focusing on the problems, identify the parts that are going right and try to reproduce those results. Heath calls this a bright spots focus.

Here’s an example — let’s say you set a New Year’s resolution to get more exercise, and that looking back you haven’t been as consistent as you hoped. You probably exercised on some days – what made those days different? If you do some detective work to identify those bright spots (“I woke up earlier on those days,” or “I had my gym bag ready-to-go by the front door,”) you can focus on increasing the number of good days, rather than scolding yourself for having bad days.

Have you found any bright spots? Leave your answers in the comments.

Asking for Favors on the Phone

Let them know why you're calling

Let them know why you’re calling

Over at his blog Both Sides of the Table Mark Suster writes about effective phone calls. As a venture capitalist, Suster gets a lot of phone calls asking for favors, advice, or recommendations. Suster doesn’t mind this, it goes along with his line of work, but he does have some recommendations for those who are calling him:

Let them know why you’re calling – When you’re ready to pivot the conversation your next line should be some derivative of, “listen, the reason I’m calling is … blah, blah, blah.” 25% of people or less actually do this. They just talk and I’m not really sure why they called.

If you’re calling for a reason, the sooner the recipient knows the sooner they can help. If the clock runs out they’re not going to be able to help.

In your life as a new dentist there are bound to be some high-stakes phone calls, whether you are calling a dentist who might hire an associate, a lender who might fund a practice purchase, or a mentor who might help you get to the next level in organized dentistry, there’s no avoiding making these calls.

What steps do you take to ensure success when you have to ask someone for a favor over the phone? Anything you’ve tried (or that someone has tried on you) that doesn’t work in a phone call? Leave your answer in the comments.

The ADA New Dentist Conference 2013 – Awards!

Dr Dan Edwards accepts the Golden Apple Award for Outstanding Leadership in Mentoring from Dr Eric Childs

Dr Dan Edwards accepts the Golden Apple Award for Outstanding Leadership in Mentoring from Dr Eric Childs

Mr Kevin Goles accepts the Golden Apple Award for New Dentist Leadership from Dr Jennifer Enos on behalf of Dr. David White

Mr Kevin Goles accepts the Golden Apple Award for New Dentist Leadership from Dr Jennifer Enos on behalf of Dr. David White

Dr. Jeffrey Wight accepts the New Dentist Committee Outstanding Program Award of Excellence on behalf of The Arizona Dental Association Subcommittee on the New Dentist. Dr. Jennifer Enos is shown presenting the award to Dr. Wight.

Dr. Jeffrey Wight accepts the New Dentist Committee Outstanding Program Award of Excellence on behalf of The Arizona Dental Association Subcommittee on the New Dentist. Dr. Jennifer Enos is shown presenting the award to Dr. Wight.

Dr. Michael Auld accepts the Outstanding New Dentist Committee Award on behalf of the Oklahoma Dental Association New Dentist Committee. Dr. Michael LeBlanc is shown presenting the award to Dr. Auld.

Dr. Michael Auld accepts the Outstanding New Dentist Committee Award on behalf of the Oklahoma Dental Association New Dentist Committee. Dr. Michael LeBlanc is shown presenting the award to Dr. Auld.

Getting the Most out of Mentoring

mentoring

Get the most out of mentoring

Yesterday we congratulated winners of the 11th Annual New Dentist Committee Awards Luncheon taking place at the 27th New Dentist Conference. The subject of mentors and mentoring came up a lot.

A few days ago we posted about how to find a mentor. If you have found a new mentor and are ready to start that conversation, here are some suggestions, originally published in ADA New Dentist News:

Start Small Just as you would be wary of someone who proposed marriage on the first date, a potential mentor may shy away from a formal request for mentorship. Instead, start out by asking for advice on a single, well-defined challenge. For instance, “How do you approach case acceptance when the patient’s objection is that it will take too much time?”

Show that you are Serious If you received good advice, implement it and report back to your potential mentor. You’ll demonstrate that you are a good investment for the mentor’s time and effort. This might be a time to suggest a casual meeting over coffee.

Be Quick to Listen, Slow to Defend A key component of your mentor’s value is a willingness to share frank observations with you. While there is no expectation that you agree with all the feedback you receive, resist the urge to contradict your mentor. A useful phrase for you is, “Wow, you and I are looking at the same information and coming to two different conclusions. Will you share more of your thinking so I can see this from your point of view?”

Remember to Have Fun A mentorship should be an energy boost for both of you, not another in a list of “ought to do” obligations. Remember to reach out to your mentor to share good news, to make purely social invitations, and connect in other ways that aren’t primarily about you asking for guidance.

A Cool Story about Mentoring

Kevin Goles

Kevin Goles

Kevin Goles is attending the 27th New Dentist Conference — he’s a member of the Class of 2015 at the University of Michigan School of Dentistry.

Kevin accepted the New Dentist Leadership award on behalf of Dr. David White who wasn’t able to attend the awards luncheon. Dr. White mentored Kevin back when Kevin was a pre-dental student in Nevada.

And Kevin stuck around to help present the award for Outstanding Leadership in Mentoring to Dr. Dan Edwards, who is a current mentor to Kevin in Michigan, and a former mentor of Dr. Dan White!

“Dr. White really expanded my knowledge and grew my interest in dentistry and my passion for helping people. He helped me make decisions about my dental education and prepare me for taking on leadership roles. And now that I have these student leadership positions, Dr. Edwards is helping me make sure that I can manage all these priorities and stay effective.”

Of course mentoring is not just for dental students. Both ADA President Dr. Robert Faiella and Immediate Past President Dr. William Calnon gave interviews to ADA News citing the value of mentoring they received after school.

If you already have a mentor, congratulations! And if you’d like to get started with a mentoring relationship we have ideas.

Attending state or local dental meetings is an ideal way to meet successful dentists in a low-stress environment. Find a directory of state and local dental societies at ADA.org/societydirectories.