DCSIMG
Header Logo Band

Dental Students

My New Dentist Life: From graduation to South Carolina

Editor’s note: This is the first article in a New Dentist Now blog series, My New Dentist Life, following a new dentist’s first year experiences out of dental school. The views expressed in this article are the personal opinions of the author and are not intended to reflect the views, positions or policies of the ADA or the New Dentist Committee.

Hello!  My name is Emily Hobart and I am a new dentist.

Dr. Emily Hobart at graduation.

Dr. Emily Hobart at graduation.

That felt an awful lot like introducing myself to a group of complete strangers at a self-help meeting. Although in all reality, that is what I am here to do – help!  I have been tasked with updating the masses – curious dental students, fellow new dentists and seasoned dentists alike – on all of the nitty gritty details of what it is like to be a new dentist, fresh out of school, right now. Throughout the year I will share my story. But who knows, I may just end up candidly dishing my embarrassing first-year blunders. I am as interested as you are to see how this all pans out. Either way it should be a lot of fun!

But first, some background.

Deciding where to practice

Like I mentioned, I am a brand new dentist. I just graduated from Midwestern University College of Dental Medicine – Arizona in Glendale, Arizona with the fun-loving Class of 2015.  After surviving D4 year, which felt very much like a circus with all of the hoops that we had to jump through – NDBE Part II, NERB/WREB and all of their components, clinical competencies, and (oh yeah) delivering top notch patient care – here I am!  With all of the busy day-to-day activities of fourth year, focusing on the future was not a priority for me. I found this to be a good thing because for me the future was a blank white canvas. I am unmarried, without children, and my family lives on opposite ends of the continent – I could literally go anywhere and do anything I wanted.  As freeing as that sounds, it was actually pretty scary.

Dr. Hobart and her classmates walking  to graduation to the tune of bagpipes. (photo by Rachel Heinz)

Dr. Hobart and her classmates walking to graduation to the tune of bagpipes. (photo by Rachel Heinz)

A timeline of Dr. Hobart’s journey from her last year of dental school to practicing in South Carolina.

A timeline of Dr. Hobart’s journey from her last year of dental school to practicing in South Carolina.

Having grown up in Glendale, less than 5 minutes from Midwestern, I was ready for a change. But like I said, I had no idea where I wanted to go. Because of this, I took both NERB and WREB since my school offered both. I was one of two students in my class to do so.  I basically wanted the freedom to work in as many places as possible. This meant that I had twice the requirements, twice the cost, and unfortunately, twice the stress!  The anxiety of these exams didn’t come from worry about my abilities – by that point I knew what I was doing – it came from the variables that were out of my control. Will my patient show up?  Will I have enough time to complete the exam with the long grading lines? I suffered through this twice. If you would like my opinion on either exam or how they compared, just ask.

I finished up all of these requirements and moved on to the job search in early April (which I panicked was too late because I had many proactive friends who already found jobs at that point). I narrowed down my focus to the South (How different can you get?), namely South Carolina and Georgia. I soon found out that Georgia would not be a possibility because they only accept the CRDTS exam – which is exactly the same thing as NERB. If I wanted to work there, I would have to retake the exact same exam – find (and possibly pay) patients, fly myself and them to a school in a state that holds that exam and pray that everything works out the first time. Lesson learned: The real world doesn’t always make sense.  But now that I narrowed down which state I wanted to work in, I could start applying for my license.

Getting my license

Dr. Hobart with Dr. Russell Gilpatrick, dean of Midwestern University College of Dental Medicine.

Dr. Hobart with Dr. Russell Gilpatrick, dean of Midwestern University College of Dental Medicine.

Of course, I couldn’t actually apply for my license until the week of my official graduation date when my school would send the states of my choosing a copy of my official transcript.  I applied for a license in Arizona even though I didn’t intend to work there right away because I wanted to have a standing license in a WREB state in addition to a NERB state (South Carolina).  Another lesson learned: This process takes a long time!  (Although it depends on the state and the time of year that you apply.) I applied for both licenses on May 11, Arizona by paper application and South Carolina online. My Arizona license came about two weeks later on May 27. I didn’t get my South Carolina license until July 13 – a full nine weeks later.

How I found my job

Having been an ASDA district trustee last year and involved in the organization for all four years of dental school, I had made connections with recruiters for a lot of group practices by helping to set up sponsored events. I interviewed with several group practices in South Carolina because of this. I also used the ADA Career Center to help me find job openings in the state. I fell in love with Dental Dreams (which I found with the help of this tool), interviewed, and I was offered a job with Family Dental in Columbia, South Carolina, in early May. This process, though daunting, was way easier than I thought it would be.

My start date was supposed to be July 13, but since I got my license on that date, I wasn’t able to start. Once my license arrived, I had to apply for my controlled substances license (required by some states) before I could apply for my DEA license. I also had a stack of new hire and credentialing paperwork to fill out. With any luck, I will start soon.

SouthCarolinaRoad tripping to South Carolina

To get from Arizona to South Carolina, I employed my favorite form of travel – the road trip! My boyfriend and I packed a car full of stuff, and I had my car shipped across the country. Four days on the I-40 was exciting because I saw states that I had never seen before. I even got to stay with my friend Dr. Daryn Lu, former ASDA vice president, in Oklahoma City.

Dr. Hobart did an "escape the room" in Oklahoma City to escape the torrential downpour outside.

Dr. Hobart did an “escape the room” in Oklahoma City to escape the torrential downpour outside.

When I arrived in Columbia, I spent a few days apartment searching. I had done a lot of pre-research, but I needed to see the places for myself. I picked one, but in true real world fashion, it wouldn’t be ready for about a week. I took a “forced vacation” in the meantime, road tripping to Myrtle Beach, Savannah, Charleston and Charlotte. Columbia is thankfully close to so many other cool cities.

Next time: My blog post is about my first week on the job! I promise it won’t be as long as this one!

Dr. Emily Hobart is a New Dentist Now guest blogger and an estranged Canadian who grew up in Glendale, Arizona, where she attended dental school at Midwestern University. She is now finding her way as a new dentist in Columbia, South Carolina. In her free time, she loves running, rock climbing, pub trivia, karaoke and traveling!

New Dentist Conference, ADA annual meeting inspire new dentists, dental students

Westwood, Calif. — While many 2015 dental graduates are busy looking for or settling into practices, one of their fellow graduates is urging both them and dental students to mark some days in early November on their calendars.

Dr. Mendoza

Dr. Mendoza

The New Dentist Conference, which for the first time will coincide with the ADA annual meeting, which takes place in Washington, D.C. from Nov. 5-10. New dentists can participate in both meetings this year and experience all ADA 2015 has to offer, featuring high-level networking opportunities during Leadership Day; a new dentist reception at Penn Social; inspiration from keynote speaker Daymond John, entrepreneur and “Shark Tank” co-star; an exclusive, customized continuing education track featuring real-time interactive technology and more.

Dental students and new dentists alike should make every attempt to attend both events, said Dr. Kristopher Mendoza of the UCLA School of Dentistry Class of 2015.

He should know, considering that he is the immediate past president of the American Student Dental Association and has been an active participant in two past ADA annual meetings.

“It’s a great time to recharge and see what’s beyond dental school,” Dr. Mendoza said.

The 25-year-old dentist, who has just begun a three-year residency in dental anesthesiology at UCLA, said that while the advantages of attending the annual meeting are myriad, one in particular is especially useful for dental students and new dentists.

“One of the greatest benefits for students at the annual meeting is definitely networking with other dentists and students,” Dr. Mendoza said. “Everyone there is extremely helpful, helping the next generation of dentists. They want to see you succeed.”

New Dentist Conference 2015There are several reasons why connecting and interacting with students and more established dentists is important, Dr. Mendoza said. One is that dental students close to graduation and new dentists are seeking jobs, and he has found that some of the established dentists have looked at dentists to join their practices or even sell their practices to.

A second reason is that the ADA annual meeting exposes current and new students to a national community of dentists who provide perspective and inspiration. Attending dental school can place students in a bubble but going to a conference with hundreds of other people who had gone through the experience or were going through the experience invigorated him, he said.

“It was my break,” Dr. Mendoza said. “It helped keep me going. You’re not the only one going through it. It gave me a better outlook on the dental field.” It helped Dr. Mendoza because when he grew up in Fresno, California, he didn’t have any dentists in the family to relate to.

Dr. Mendoza gets asked frequently from younger dentists and dental students if they should join the ADA. “I would challenge them to explore all that being a member offers,” he said. “The value far exceeds the cost.”

Registration for ADA 2015 is open online at ADA.org/meeting.

For a list of courses planned, visit eventscribe.com/ADA/2015.

Search for #ADADC on Twitter and Facebook for more on the ADA annual meeting.

ADA president points dental students to ethics contest

The ADA Council on Ethics, Bylaws and Judicial Affairs is currently accepting entries for this year’s Student Ethics Video Contest. The deadline to submit entries is July 31.

“The American Dental Association has a 150-year-old Code of Ethics,” Dr. Feinberg says on ADA YouTube video. “For a century and a half, it’s been our moral compass – our North Star – and it guides everything we do. I graduated from dental school 35 years ago, and every day it’s my goal to earn and maintain my patients’ trust by abiding by this code. Students, we’d love to see what you can do.”

This year, the contest will include a second competitive category, created for videos that promote patient safety through ethical treatment. A grand prize and an honorable mention award will be available for each category.

The new category is the result of the participation and support of CNA in this year’s Student Ethics Video Contest.

The contest is open to degree-seeking students at, or new graduates of, any ADA-accredited dental school who are 18 or older and U.S. citizens. Entrants must also be ADA student members or members in good standing of the American Student Dental Association.

To qualify, videos should be no more than four and a half minutes and must portray the application of one or more principle, code or advisory opinion contained in the ADA Principles of Ethics and Code of Professional Conduct. To be eligible in the new category, the video should focus on ethical treatment promoting or enhancing patient safety and treatment outcomes.

CEBJA will announce the winners at the ADA 2015 – America’s Dental Meeting in Washington, D.C. For more information, contest rules and entry forms, contact Earl Sewell at sewelle@ada.org or access the link here.

UNC, dental foundation establish memorial award for slain students

deah_yusor

Deah Barakat, 23, his wife Yusor Mohammad Abu-Salha, 21

Chapel Hill, N.C. — The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Dental Foundation of North Carolina have established a memorial award in honor of two dental students killed this year.

On Feb. 10, Deah Barakat, 23, his wife Yusor Mohammad Abu-Salha, 21, and his 19-year-old sister-in-law Razan Mohammad Abu-Salha were fatally shot in their Chapel Hill, North Carolina, apartment. Police officers arrested their neighbor, Craig Stephen Hicks, 46, for the shooting.

The Deah Barakat and Yusor Abu-Salha Memorial Award was established in consultation with both students’ families and will be presented for the first time this fall. Mr. Barakat was a second-year student at the UNC School of Dentistry and Ms. Abu-Salha was to enter as a first-year in August. The award will provide support to a UNC School of Dentistry student or group of students who plan a local, national or international service product that, Mr. Barakat’s brother, Farris, said “will give back to communities that need help the most,” according to a UNC news release.

“Deah and Yusor led lives of great purpose and this fund is a fitting tribute to their humanitarian devotions,” UNC Chancellor Carol L. Folt said in a news release. “Through this award, the Carolina community is honoring their legacy of creating a more compassionate world through dentistry and delivering aid to those who are more vulnerable and in need.”

Mr. Barakat had volunteered at dental clinics overseas and had plans to travel to Turkey with 10 dentists this summer to help Syrian refugee students in need of dental care. He had posted a YouTube video last September asking for donations to raise money for supplies and equipment. Through his efforts, Project Refugee Smiles successfully raised the funds for the trip.

“Deah and Yusor had incredible hearts for service,” said Dr. Jane Weintraub, dean and alumni distinguished professor at the UNC School of Dentistry. “They often gave their weekends to working at homeless shelters or the North Carolina Missions of Mercy clinics and were no strangers to international service trips. Through this award, we’ll be able to not only educate our students about their lives of service but also continue their legacy of giving back for years to come.”

The Dental Foundation of North Carolina and UNC each committed $30,000 to the endowed fund. Those who wish to contribute can visit giving.unc.edu/gift/sod and select “Barakat Memorial Fund” from the dropdown menu.

ECU dental school’s first graduating class establishes endowment

ECU dental school Class of 2015

ECU dental school Class of 2015

According to the ECU School of Dental Medicine News, the first graduating class of East Carolina University dental school established an endowment to support patient care and student learning.

The endowed gift — the Inaugural Class Patient Care Endowment — received 100 percent participation by the 50 graduates and matching funds from the ECU Medical and Health Sciences Foundation. It currently stands at $33,000.

“The Class of 2015 takes great pride in the palpable impact that the school is already having on North Carolina, and we are inspired by our faculty’s commitment to service. Our dedication to carrying out the school’s mission and fulfilling our class pledge extends beyond our years here. It is with this in mind that we have established the patient fund,” said Dr. Kelly Walsh, class vice president, who co-presented the gift at the school’s convocation on May 8.

To read the full story, click here.

World’s first dental school celebrates 175th anniversary

Baltimore — The University of Maryland School of Dentistry, the first dental college in the world, celebrated a new milestone May 30 — its 175th anniversary.

Birthday Candles“In conveying admiration for venerable institutions, people often generously use the word ‘pioneering,’ but there is nothing inflated about applying that term to our School of Dentistry,” said Jay A. Perman, M.D., president of the University of Maryland, Baltimore in a pre-recorded address to the 250 faculty staff, students, alumni and friends who gathered at the Baltimore Hyatt Regency.

“You are, of course, the world’s very first dental college,” he said. “But my deep pride is rooted in the fact that, these many years later, you’re still one of the best.”

Its founders, Drs. Horace H. Hayden and Chapin A. Harris, first established the school in 1840 as the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery. According to the School of Dentistry website, BCDS served as a prototype for dental schools gradually established in other American cities. The present dental school evolved through a series of consolidations, the final of which in 1923 when BCDS and the Dental Department of the University of Maryland were combined to create a distinct college of the university.

Dr. Mark A. Reynolds, dean of the School of Dentistry, welcomed the crowd to the celebration, along with Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame third baseman Brooks Robison, the evening’s keynote speaker. In addition, several special guests included past deans of the dental school and past presidents of the university.

“Throughout our school’s history, our tradition of excellence in dental education, research and service has been safeguarded by the support of our dedicated alumni and friends,” said Dr. Reynolds. “Your support helps enable our world-class faculty to advance science, offer outstanding service and clinical care and provide an exceptional education for our students.”

UCSF dental student receives Zuckerman Fellowship

San Francisco — University of California San Francisco dental student Jean Marie Calvo was selected for the Zuckerman Fellows program, which will financially support her to pursue a Master of Public Health degree from Harvard’s School of Public Health.

Ms. Calvo

Ms. Calvo

“If I’m going to be a dentist who wants to make a difference, I wanted the (MPH) degree to help me get more people access to care,” Ms. Calvo said. “I want to make a larger impact in improving public health.”

The Zuckerman Fellowship program was established to enable professionals to pursue public service degrees at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, Harvard School of Public Health, or Harvard Kennedy School. Its intent is to bring the perspectives of multiple professions and academic disciplines to bear on public sector problems, according to its website.

Ms. Calvo is taking a leave of absence from her studies at the UCSF School of Dentistry to complete the MPH by May 2016.

Although there aren’t any health care professionals in her family, Ms. Calvo said her mother stressed the importance of good oral health, inspiring her to ultimately pursue a career in dentistry.

“I’ve wanted to become a dentist for a very long time,” she said. “And through dental school and volunteering, I realized that there’s a lot of problems when it comes to access to care.”

Ms. Calvo plans to use her MPH and dental degree to work as a dentist in a community clinic, ultimately becoming a community clinic director.

“Being selected as a future dentist, it made me see that the [Zuckerman Fellows program] considers oral health a pertinent issue in the overall public health,” she said.

Student ethics video contest deadline July 31

The ADA Council on Ethics, Bylaws and Judicial Affairs is accepting entries for the 2015 Student Ethics Video Contest. The deadline to submit entries is July 31.

Since 2010, CEBJA has annually sponsored the contest to draw student attention to the ethical dilemmas that dental students and professional dentists may encounter and to provide an exercise focusing on appropriate responses based on the ADA Principles of Ethics and Code of Professional Conduct. This year, the contest will include a second competitive category, created for videos that promote patient safety through ethical treatment. A grand prize and an honorable mention award will be available for each category.

The new category is the result of the participation and support of CNA in this year’s Student Ethics Video Contest.

The contest is open to degree-seeking students at, or new graduates of, any ADA-accredited dental school who are 18 or older and U.S. citizens.  Entrants must also be ADA student members or members in good standing of the American Student Dental Association.

To qualify, videos should be no more than four and a half minutes and must portray the application of one or more principle, code or advisory opinion contained in the ADA Principles of Ethics and Code of Professional Conduct. To be eligible in the new category, the video should focus on ethical treatment promoting or enhancing patient safety and treatment outcomes.

CEBJA will announce the winners at the ADA 2015 — America’s Dental Meeting in Washington, D.C. For more information, contest rules and entry forms, contact Earl Sewell at sewelle@ada.org.

To view previous years’ winning videos, click here.

Win a Fitbit Flex office package through the Center for Professional Success

Looking to improve your fitness and the health of your staff? Member dentists have a chance to win a Fitbit Flex office package (six devices) by logging into the Center for Professional Success website and entering the monthly contest.

Center for Professional SuccessTo enter, simply log in with your user ID and password at Success.ADA.org, click the Fitbit image and register by April 30.

Last month, Brett Nelson, a dental student at the University of Colorado, won an Apple iPad Air.

The ADA Center for Professional Success is an ADA member-only interactive Web resource where dentists and dental students can find practice management information and decision support tools and applications, along with online and in-person executive management certificate and life mastery programs. Through the Center, dentists can discover relevant and impactful solutions to the business challenges they face every day in the office. Visit Success.ADA.org to learn more.