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Continuing Education

Conducting research? ADA Library & Archives is your go-to source

ADA Library & ArchivesWhether it’s historical information on the dental profession or the latest scientific studies on dentistry, the ADA Library & Archives is the place to go for any dental researcher — in person or online.

With the help of a team of experienced library professionals, the ADA Library & Archives offers access to a unique collection of electronic, print and archival material.

And since the launch of the ADA Library & Archives eResources in August 2013, more ADA members are accessing and downloading more journal articles.

These early 20th century handpieces are among historical items displayed at the ADA Library & Archives, which maintain the Association's historical records and publications.

These early 20th century handpieces are among historical items displayed at the ADA Library & Archives, which maintain the Association’s historical records and publications.

In 2014, 5,252 visitors conducted 8,177 searches, and ultimately downloaded 5,452 articles, according to data provided by the ADA Library & Archives. In comparison, 95 members requested 614 articles for the entire year of 2012.

This gavel, displayed at the ADA Library & Archives at ADA Headquarters, was made from a wood salvaged from Grant Hall, the site of the Aug. 4, 1859, organizational meeting of the American Dental Association.

This gavel, displayed at the ADA Library & Archives at ADA Headquarters, was made from a wood salvaged from Grant Hall, the site of the Aug. 4, 1859, organizational meeting of the American Dental Association.

“Members who want to continue their education, put together presentations, are curious and want to learn more about a topic or find needed information for their patients now have a one-stop library to find literature or the information they need,” said Dr. Hal Fair, chair of the ADA Library & Archives advisory board.

ADA members can access full-text articles online with instant access to about 290 journals through the ADA Library & Archives website. About 95 percent are strictly dental journals. The other 5 percent have medical-dental crossover, including in-house access to the New England Journal of Medicine articles going all the way back to 1812. Thirteen new journal titles, including the Journal of the American Medical Association, and 14 new book titles will be added this year.

Other ADA Library services include:

  • Recommendations or referrals to sources of dental information.
  • Assistance with PubMed and Internet searches.
  • Access to ADA Archives and historical information.
  • Customized lists of current articles and abstracts on dental topics.
  • Space for quiet study or meetings at the ADA Library, located at ADA Headquarters in Chicago.

In addition, the ADA Archives, located within the ADA Library, maintain the Association’s historical records and publications, which include answers to questions concerning the history of the organization, the dental profession and the people involved in its development and history.

For more information on the ADA Library & Archives, visit ADA.org/library.

Austin, Texas, dentist shares his approach to continuing education

Austin, Texas — Dr. Vincent Ip left his role in a cosmetic dentistry practice to return to his native state of Texas to pursue his passion to provide oral health care for families.

Dr. Vincent Ip

Dr. Vincent Ip

This native son of Stephenville, Texas, founded Smile 360 in Austin to realize that dream, and continuing education has helped him do just that.

“I’m always looking to expand my dental knowledge and stay current in my craft,” he said. “I pride myself and my office on the fact that we are state-of-the-art and always try to use the latest and greatest equipment and ideas to benefit our patients.”

He completed two courses at ADA 2014 — America’s Dental Meeting that covered lasers in managing periodontal patients: Manage Your Periodontal Patients with Techno Power and Utilizing Dental Lasers in a Periodontal Environment (both with Dr. Samuel Low).

“I signed up to juxtapose the traditional way with the new way — lasers — so that I have the knowledge of both,” he said.

He also took Concepts and Procedures for Predictable Crown Lengthening (Dr. Jim Grisdale). Dr. Ip shared practical and tactical advice for other new dentists when planning their CE options.

Managing expectations

“I take classes to broaden my knowledge. I need to have the ability to explain procedures and treatments to my patients in a way they understand so they know what lies ahead,”

Dr. Ip said “Patients are looking at me as the expert.

“I want all of my patients to leave my office wanting to commit to their health and their teeth. The only way for them to do this is if I keep learning new tools to help them commit.”

Taking it chairside

Dr. Ip appreciates CE that allows participants to work hands-on, citing chairside benefits in periodontics classes.

“More than half of my patients have periodontal disease,” Dr. Ip said. “So obviously this is something that I need to stay very current on. I also need my patients to feel confident that I can help them treat their disease. There is not a day on my schedule that I don’t have a perio patient .”

He said classes like the ones he took at the ADA annual meeting provided him with the information needed to give his patients the options to decide what is best for them and their health.

Getting the full experience

Aside from options at the ADA annual meeting, other opportunities for CE exploration are available on ADA CE Online — adaceonline.org. A 50 percent discount is available using promo code 482153.

Dr. Ip mentioned enjoying the comradeship with his coworkers and other peers during CE courses and workshops.

Coming in November, check out the New Dentist Conference in Washington, D.C., scheduled for the first time in conjunction with ADA 2015 — America’s Dental Meeting. Exclusive benefits will include a VIP lounge, access to significantly reduced hotel rates, high-level networking opportunities and a customized CE track featuring live interactive technology. For more information about the New Dentist Conference and all that the Nov. 5-10 annual meeting has to offer, visit ADA. org/meeting.

Register for 2015 ADEA Dental Student Virtual Fair

Dental students interested in learning about what comes after graduation, and how to juggle residency applications, writing a resume, leadership and different types of dental careers, should register for the 2015 ADEA Student Virtual Fair.

The free, live, online event will be held 4-10 p.m. EST on April 2. To register, click here.

The 2015 ADEA Dental Student Virtual Fair is designed to give dental students free access to information and connect them with professionals from ADEA, dental specialties and dental companies who can answer their questions in real time.

In addition, two ADA New Dentist Committee representatives — Drs. Kendra Zappia and Jon Pascarella — will be participating in a panel presentation from 7-7:30 p.m. The ADA will also have a booth for attendees to visit.

All dental students are welcome to attend the event. Recent graduates interested in learning about different career options are also welcome to attend.

Students will be able to:

  • Log in to the event from any Internet connected device.
  • Speak directly with dental specialty program directors and association professionals, military recruiters and corporate sponsor exhibitors in live text chat rooms.
  • View presentations about financial aid, interviewing for residencies, ADEA PASS and much more.
  • Download and save resources from dental professionals to access after the live event.
  • Learn about the ADEA PASS application process.
  • Listen to a keynote presentation from the ADEA Chair of the Board, Dr. Lily Garcia.

For more information, including the exhibitor list and presentation lineup, click here.

RWJF seeks research award applications

Are you interested becoming a dental faculty member and from a historically disadvantaged background?

signing a documentThe Robert Wood Johnson Foundation is seeking applications, due March 18, for the 2015 Harold Amos Medical Faculty Development Program.

RWJF created the program, named after the first African-American to chair a department at Harvard University’s medical school, to help increase the number of underrepresented minorities on medical faculties.

The program offers four-year postdoctoral research awards to increase the number of faculty from historically disadvantaged backgrounds who can achieve senior rank in academic medicine and dentistry, and who will encourage and foster the development of succeeding classes of such dentists and physicians.

The program will fund up to 10 four-year awards. Scholars will received an annual stipend of up to $75,000 each, complemented by a $30,000 annual grant to support research activities.

For more information, including key dates and eligibility and selection criteria, click here.

New dentist wins ADA monthly free management course giveaway

Congratulations to Dr. Radip Uprety, of Bucksport, Maine, for being the February winner of the monthly giveaway for a free ADA Executive Program in Dental Practice Management class.

Clinical and BusinessThe ADA Executive Program in Dental Practice Management is a video-based, e-learning certificate program offered through the ADA Center for Professional Success that takes on the tough practice management challenges today’s dentists must master. This includes reducing costs, enhancing marketing strategies and practicing amid increased regulation.

These six online courses help dentists navigate the business side of dentistry:

  • Legal and ethical issues in dental practice.
  • Negotiation and conflict management.
  • Understanding leadership.
  • Business strategy and systems.
  • Dental team management.
  • Financial management.

For each course completed, verification of potential continuing education credits will be issued. One winner will be named each month this year.

To enter the giveaway, click here.

Visit PMcertificate.Success.ADA.org or call 1.855.598.6559 to learn more about the program.

When interacting with challenging patients, behavior awareness can help

As my patient pool grows, the dentistry doesn’t change much, but the person in my chair changes every day. I connect with most patients pretty well, but every now and then I am presented with a challenge. What I would call a difficult patient has nothing to do with the dentistry required in their mouth. The difficulty comes from the patient interaction. I know myself, I know the dentistry, but there is something missing in my understanding of the patient.

Dr. Carolyn Norton

Dr. Carolyn Norton

I received some insight from one of my attendings at my GPR program, who is also an L.D. Pankey Institute faculty member. He introduced me to the Social Styles Model, which is taught at the Pankey Institute along with the concept of relationship based dentistry. Our discussion led me to the TRAMCOM Group website. Here they elaborate on the specifics of the Social Styles Model.

In the 1960s Roger Reid and John Merrill created the Social Styles Model to help predict human interactions in business relationships. They identified three variables that determine a person’s social style: assertiveness, responsiveness, and versatility. Within these behavioral dimensions four social styles emerged: analytical, amiable, driving, and expressive.

Responsiveness is determined by how much you control or reveal your emotions. Assertiveness is based on where you fall in the spectrum of ask versus tell, or lead versus follow.

No one social style is better than the others, and each style has its own pros and cons. Once you get familiar with each social style, you will begin to pick up on clues that tell you which style your patient uses. Here are four unique behavioral patterns recognized in the Social Style Model, according to The TRACOM Group:

ADA New Dentist guest blogDriving style patients control their emotions and speak assertively. These people want to know the facts about their treatment. Be direct and practical regarding their problems and treatment options. They are focused on the end result and want to know you have a plan.

Amiable style patients show their emotions and prefer to ask questions than give orders. These patients are friendly and ask questions because it makes them feel more comfortable. Take the time to talk with them and get personal. It will definitely pay off.

Analytical style patients control their emotions and prefer to ask questions than give orders. They ask questions because they want to know all of the details. They want to understand each step, the cost, and maybe even the number of appointments. They appreciate precision and accuracy. Take time to develop their treatment plan to show that you care about these things too.

Expressive patients show their emotions and speak assertively. These patients will share their thoughts and feelings regarding their dental problems, but may need your direction. Let them speak, you listen, and then help them focus on their needs.

The next time you have a challenging or difficult patient, look at this social style chart and see where they belong. If you understand why a patient is behaving a certain way, then this may help you alter your social style to make the interaction successful and prevent frustration. This is where versatility comes in. Versatility is primarily the responsibility of the dentist in the patient-doctor relationship. A versatile dentist can alter their social style to make the patient more comfortable. This requires a certain level of awareness and compassion for the patients social needs, not just their dental needs.

I can easily recall patients that fit each social style. Seeing them through this lens makes me like them better as people, and I will definitely change how I interact with them at our next appointment.

 

Dr. Carolyn Norton is a New Dentist Now guest blogger and a 2014 graduate of the University of Florida College of Dentistry. She is in a 12-month general practice residency at the North Shore University Hospital in Evanston, Ill., affiliated with the University of Chicago. Dr. Norton was a contributing editor for the American Student Dental Association from 2012-14.

Are you interested in learning about the different types of group practices?

Learn more about the different types of group practices in videos posted on the ADA Center for Professional Success website.

Center for Professional SuccessDentists from three different practice group models spoke at ADA 2014 — America’s Dental Meeting in San Antonio about their organization’s structure, management, patient care and more. In 2014, the ADA Health Policy Institute proposed a classification system for group practices and a nomenclature that would more specifically describe them.

The videos include presentations on group practices that are dentist-owned and operated; affiliated with a dental management organization affiliated; insurer-provider; not-for-profit; and government agencies.

The presentations are available here.

Learn how to identify drug-seeking patients in upcoming webinar

An upcoming webinar aims to educate dentists on how to interview patients with addiction problems and identify those who are just seeking drugs.

prescription drugsInterviewing and Counseling Patients with Substance Use Disorders and Drug-Seeking Patients is scheduled for Feb. 18 from 2-3 p.m. Central time. Michael O’Neil, Pharm.D., professor of pharmacy practice at South College in Knoxville, Tennessee, will lead the webinar and review basic interview and counseling skills that help optimize patient care and protect dentists from patients who may have criminal intent.

Dentists may find themselves the targets of prescription drug diversion scams and schemes and the webinar will provide tips on how to talk to patients about their intentions and counseling that will help minimize risks to the patient and dentist.

To register, contact Alison Siwek at siweka@ada.org. Registration closes Feb. 16.

Know the difference between accidents and signs of domestic violence?

In a year where high-profile accusations of family violence have rocked the National Football League, the ADA House of Delegates streamlined Association policy on family violence during its meetings at ADA 2014 — America’s Dental Meeting in San Antonio, according to ADA News.

An employee crying

Resolution 89H-2014, Educating Dental Professionals in Recognizing and Reporting Abuse, states that “the ADA supports educating dental professionals to recognize abuse and neglect across all age groups and reporting such incidences to the proper authorities as required by state law.” The House rescinded policies from 1993 and 1996.

“Family violence has been a hot topic in the news media as high-profile players in the NFL have been accused of violence against children or partners,” said Dr. Lynn Douglas Mouden, chief dental officer for the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. “There is a universal mandate for U. S. dentists to report suspected cases of abuse or neglect of children, but dentists should also be aware that some states also mandate reporting cases that deal with adults and elders as well.”

Are you able to discern the difference between accidents and intentional injuries or signs of violence? Do you know what your state’s law in regards to reporting family violence?

If your answer is “no,” Dr. Mouden suggests attending the 7th Biennial National Conference on Health and Domestic Violence, set for March 19-21, at the Renaissance Washington, D.C. Downtown Hotel.

“With training, dentists are better able to discern the difference between accidents and intentional injuries, or between otherwise normal conditions and the signs of violence,” Dr. Mouden said. “Because laws vary from state to state, dentists should work with their state dental association to learn more about the laws regarding reporting of family violence and about opportunities to learn more about preventing family violence.”

For more details on the conference, hotel accommodations or to register, click here.

10 steps to increase provider participation in Medicaid/streamline administration

Here are 10 steps to increase provider participation in Medicaid and to streamline the administrative process from Action for Dental Health, a nationwide, community-based movement aimed at ending the dental health crisis facing America today.

Action for Dental Health

  • Step 1: Talk with the manager of Provider Enrollment for your state and review the process for enrolling in the Medicaid program. Confirm basic information such as documentation expectations, electronic filing and ability to participate on a limited basis.
  • Step 2: Identify populations of interest that your practice will serve. Determine how those patients will access your practice, whether via local community outreach or referrals from the local community health center after being triaged.
  • Step 3: Discuss with your state dental association the current baseline of provider participation and the data that will be coordinated as reported by your state to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services in its CMS 416 report. This information is the basis for determining what positive results are being seen due to increased provider participation.
  • Step 4: Participate in a state Dental Medicaid Advisory Committee or form a committee if one does not exist in your state. Invite other Medicaid providers, both private practice dentists and those working within community health centers, to participate.
  • Step 5: Review Medicaid rates, prior authorization and enrollment processes for your state. Are adult Medicaid benefits available? Was there an increase in providers if rates were increased? Learn what negotiation and compromise efforts were performed.
  • Step 6: To streamline your credentialing and provider eligibility process, review those states making a positive difference (Oklahoma, California, Maryland and Kentucky). Invite the people who perform the enrolling process to your Medicaid advisory committee to investigate what might be done in your state to expedite credentialing.
  • Step 7: Meet with the manager of your state Medicaid Integrity Program to learn of the processes they follow for chart audits and review. Explain the need for uniform compliance training for auditors for reviews. Discuss with your Medicaid Advisory Committee.
  • Step 8: Maintain strong lines of communication with the state Medicaid program, the state oral health program, the ADA and Medicaid-CHIP Dental Association who can be resources for you.
  • Step 9: Share program successes and failures with your local dental society.
  • Step 10: Write an article for your state dental association journal about your Dental Medicaid Advisory Committee, your experiences in treating the underserved and the value that dentistry can provide in communicating with the local medical community about the importance of integrating oral health for patient overall health.

To view the full 10-step process, click here. For more information about the ADA’s Action for Dental Health, visit ADA.org/action.