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Life as a New Dentist

Have ideas for the ADA’s Center for Professional Success?

The Center for Professional Success is a members-only Web resource that provides practice management information, online education and support tools to help you manage your career.Center for Professional Success

They are currently seeking new members for their Center for Professional Success users group. You will help determine the direction of the Center’s content. What are your major practice concerns? What tools do you need to improve your practice?

If you are interested in learning more about the user group or becoming a member, email Sarah Hughes at hughess@ada.org. The deadline to apply is Dec. 19.

 

Log on to Success.ADA.org for valuable resources

The ADA Center for Professional Success, Success.ADA.org, is a unique web portal for dentists in every practice setting who want to succeed as dental practitioners.

Resources include frequently asked questions about dental codes; information on Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act compliance issues; financial calculators for loan and overhead analysis; in-person and online educational opportunities; and guidance for new dentists on how to understand employment agreements before they sign on the dotted line.

The ultimate goal of the Center is to provide accurate answers to specific questions members have helping them balance their professional careers with their personal lives.

October issue of New Dentist News available online

The latest issue of the New Dentist News is now available online.

The October 2014 issue includes articles to help new dentists with marketing, finances and handling ethical dilemmas.

October 2014 New Dentist NewsInside this issue include:

  • Marketing snapshot — How one practice does it.
  • Marketing the dental practice: Know the rules.
  • Working with a marketing firm.
  • Advice from a lender: Be prepared before seeking a practice loan.
  • Tap the ADA Ethics Hotline for ethical dilemmas.

To read the New Dentist News, click here.

What tips have you learned when it comes to marketing your dental practice or yourself as a dentist?

Over 200 federal dentists welcomed at ADA 2014

Over 200 federal dentists attended the ADA 2014 — America’s Dental Meeting in San Antonio, with many attending the Federal Dental Services reception held Oct. 11 at the Marriott Rivercenter.

Dentists who are in full-time military or federal government service are eligible for direct ADA membership at the national level. In 2013, there were 2,816 FDS members in the ADA.

For more information on the Federal Dental Services, click here.

Take a look at the photos from the Federal Dental Services Reception held during the annual meeting.

Federal Dental Services reception Federal Dental Services reception Federal Dental Services reception

2014 New Dentist Reception

New dentists around the country connected with their peers and enjoyed the big and bold Texas ambiance during the New Dentist Reception at the ADA 2014 – America’s Dental Meeting in San Antonio. The event was a time and place for new dentists and dental students to network, exchange ideas and enjoy the fun atmosphere, which included food, drinks and music.

Here are some photos from the event:

New Dentist Reception New Dentist Reception New Dentist Reception New Dentist Reception New Dentist Reception New Dentist Reception

9 essential habits of remarkably effective people

According to an Inc.com article, there’s a difference between being efficient and being effective. Efficient people are well organized, competent and get stuff done.

“Effective people do all that…but they check the right things off their to-do list. They complete the right projects. They get the right stuff done,” according to Jeff Haden, contributing editor for Inc., in his piece, “9 Essential Habits of Remarkably Effective People.”

Here are nine traits of remarkably effective people, and why they’re so successful:

  • They always start with goals.
  • Then they create systems.
  • They believe in themselves.
  • They believe they are in control of their lives.
  • They also embrace “random.”
  • They find happiness in the success of others.
  • They use their goals to make decisions automatic.
  • They don’t multitask.
  • They freely ask for help.

As new dentists seeking success, do you have any or all of these traits of remarkably effective people?

ADA Council on Scientific Affairs extends application period for John W. Stanford New Investigator Award

The American Dental Association Council on Scientific Affairs is extending the application deadline for the 2014 John W. Stanford New Investigator Award to Oct. 31.

Applications for the Stanford New Investigator Award are accepted annually from dental students or dentists who have earned their D.D.S. or D.M.D. degrees no more than five years prior to the time of selection.

The Stanford New Investigator Award underscores the crucial role that dental standards play in patient health and safety and in the efficacy of dental products.

The award pays homage to the legacy of Dr. Stanford, a 40-year ADA employee who is credited with establishing the ADA’s current standards program.

Submissions must be original research that addresses some aspect of the use of standards in dental research or clinical application.

To apply for the John W. Stanford New Investigator Award ore learn more about the ADA Standards Programs, please visit ADA.org/dentalstandards.

In Zambia, new dentist volunteers to treat patients in a truck

Dr. Rachel Hymes poses with a group of children from Kafue, Zambia where she treated residents through International Caring Hands.

Dr. Rachel Hymes poses with a group of children from Kafue, Zambia where she treated residents through International Caring Hands.

Dr. Rachel Hymes had all the dental equipment she needed — two dental chairs, an air compressor, anesthesia and tools to perform extractions safely — inside a trailer on the back of a truck.

She’d park the vehicle, the size of a large U-Haul truck, on the grounds of the Riverside Farm Institute in Kafue, Zambia and open the mobile mini-clinic every morning. Each day, for nearly week, she saw about 40 patients seeking relief from their dental problems — ranging from large cavities to years old broken teeth.

“I decided to only do extractions,” Dr. Hymes said. “I had to make a decision. I can either serve one person in an hour, or several for one hour. The need was just tremendous.”

Since graduating from the Medical University of South Carolina in 2010, Dr. Hymes has volunteered her dentistry skills for a mission trip every year. This year, she went to Zambia with the group International Caring Hands.

Dr. Hymes found the organization through the ADA International Volunteer website. She chose the group because the mobile clinics are equipped with necessary materials and tools. All she had to do was pay for her flight.

Dr. Hymes, of Mountain City, Tennessee, and her husband, flew out of Charlotte, North Carolina to New York City on June 7. From there, they flew to Dubai and then to Lusaka, the capital of Zambia. There was another two-hour car ride before they arrived in Kafue — 28 hours later.

“It was quite a journey,” she said. They arrived on a Sunday afternoon and began working in the mobile clinic at 8:30 a.m. Monday. Most of the people she saw lived in a village close to the Institute.

Along with a local assistant and a translator, Dr. Hymes opened the clinic until 5:30 p.m. for four days, treating about 150 people of all ages.

Dr. Hymes and her dental assistant Lucas pose with the International Caring Hands' mobile dental clinic.

Dr. Hymes and her dental assistant Lucas pose with the International Caring Hands’ mobile dental clinic.

“Some people were scared. Others didn’t get the idea of being numb,” she said. “But when they were done, they would thank us and give us a hug.”

By the end of my mission, word had started to spread about the clinic and they had to turn a lot of people away.

“That was the hardest part of the trip,” she said. “We had to close even though there was still a line 20 people deep.”

Because of the need, Dr. Hymes said she hopes other dentists, especially new dentists like her, seek out ways to volunteer and use their skills to treat those in need — whether internationally or locally.

“If dentists are available to go, they should do it,” Dr. Hymes said. “(International Caring Hands) had everything a dentist needs to treat patients, all they need are people to do it.”

Dr. Hymes said International Caring Hands provided the food and a place to stay. Meanwhile, their dental equipment was in great condition.

“I enjoy getting to know people and just helping others get some relief from pain,” Dr. Hymes said. “I think as a human being, as a Christian, I feel the responsibility to help those in need. Volunteering is something I hope I can do for the rest of my life.”

At the end of her trip, Dr. Hymes said, they parked the truck in a garage where the mobile clinic will stay until another dentist comes along to volunteer.

For more information on international volunteering, visit the ADA International Volunteer website here.

Ellsworth, Maine dentist offers free exams

NBC affiliate WLBZ in Bangor, Maine reported on what a new dentist is doing to ensure kids who lack dental insurance receive the dental care they need.

Dr. Timothy Oh provided free exams and teeth cleanings to about 40 children Sept. 27 in Ellsworth, Maine as part of his “Back to School Smiles” program, which he started five years ago, according to the report.

Dr. Oh has hosted the program for 5 years, treating nearly 300 kids. His goal is to raise awareness of the importance of good oral health and early prevention for kids. The program is open to 0-18 years old who do not have dental coverage and are not receiving regular dental care.

“We want to encourage kids to start off the school year with clean, healthy teeth,” Dr. Oh told WLBZ. “If they have problems we can fix them, we can get plans to get things taken care of, so those problems don’t turn worse during the school year. Because we feel that a healthy kid, a happy kid is going to be better at learning, they’re going to do better in school.”

To view the report, click here.

Institute for Diversity in Leadership project extends dental care to Navajo Nation patients

While working at Tséhootsooi Medical Center, a hospital operated by the Navajo Nation in Fort Defiance, Arizona, Dr. Felicia Frizzell noticed a need: Patients in the Adolescent Care Unit, a psychiatric in-patient area for children ages 13-17, were not receiving basic dental check-up.

“Patients in this unit are given a physical, their eyes and ears are checked, but there is no dental screening,” said Dr. Frizzell, adding that the dental clinic’s only interaction with these patients was in an emergency basis.

Dr. Frizzell

Dr. Frizzell

In addition, as a Mescalero Apache from Mescalero, New Mexico, Dr. Frizzell said she knows all too well that Native Americans often lack dental care.

“I know this population. They’re a very young, vulnerable and a high-risk population for dental problems,” she said.

For those reasons, she chose to work on getting patients from the Adolescent Care Unit access to dental care as her project for the ADA Institute for Diversity in Leadership. Dr. Frizzell was among 12 graduates this year.

The Institute provides a diverse group of dentists with education and experience to build a lifetime of relationships and set new leadership paths within the dental profession and their community. As a key part of the experience, each participant designs and completes a personal leadership project for his or her community or the profession.

“Before the Institute, I tended to be more of an observer,” she said. “I want to be a leader. The Institute helped me to step up, learn to negotiate and boost my confidence.”

To accomplish her project, Dr. Frizzell worked with the hospital’s dental director and colleagues to figure out the logistics and process needed in order to see these patients in the Adolescent Care Unit outside of an emergency setting.

The dental clinic began seeing patients in February, providing care ranging from a basic dental check-up and cleanings to extractions and root canals. For irreversible procedures, the clinic must arrange transportation services for the patient’s parents in order to gain parental consent.

Because each patient cycle in the Adolescent Care Unit is about eight weeks long, about 12-14 new patients receive dental screenings and needed treatment after each cycle. This poses a challenge because many of the patients don’t come to their appointments after they’ve long left the ACU.

“The most difficult part right now, which we’re all still trying to find a solution, is following up on these patients,” she said.

Nonetheless, said Dr. Frizzell, it has been a successful first step and has been good way to introduce the patients to the importance of dental care.

“The kids are great and ask a lot of questions,” she said. “Because some have substance abuse issues, we try to educate how these substances can affect their teeth.”

Dr. Frizzell said she has proposed a hospital policy that, if approved, would ensure her program continues even when she’s no longer at the facility.

“As a new dentist, I want to build up my leadership and team building skills in order to benefit my patients,” she said. “Because of the Institute, I know that if I have a good idea, I can get it done.”