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After Dental School

Over 200 federal dentists welcomed at ADA 2014

Over 200 federal dentists attended the ADA 2014 — America’s Dental Meeting in San Antonio, with many attending the Federal Dental Services reception held Oct. 11 at the Marriott Rivercenter.

Dentists who are in full-time military or federal government service are eligible for direct ADA membership at the national level. In 2013, there were 2,816 FDS members in the ADA.

For more information on the Federal Dental Services, click here.

Take a look at the photos from the Federal Dental Services Reception held during the annual meeting.

Federal Dental Services reception Federal Dental Services reception Federal Dental Services reception

ADA accepting applications for Investigators in Dental Informatics Award

The American Dental Association is accepting applications for the 2015 Robert H. Ahlstrom New Investigator Award, created to encourage interest in dental informatics standards among dental students, new dentists and dentists pursuing post-doctoral studies.

Applications are due Feb. 1, 2015, and a recipient will be selected in May 2015.

The recipient of the 2015 Robert H. Ahlstrom New Investigator Award will receive airfare and accommodations to present the winning project in November 2015 at the ADA Standards Committee on Dental Informatics (SCDI) annual meeting in Washington, D.C.

Dr. Robert Ahlstrom

Dr. Robert Ahlstrom

Through the Ahlstrom Award, the ADA aims to highlight the crucial role that dental informatics standards play in improving the quality of patient care, assuring patient health and safety and increasing efficiency through use of information technology.

The ADA defines informatics as the health information technology discipline that makes appropriate health information available as needed to authorized users with the assurance of confidentiality safeguards. The goal of the ADA SCDI is to help dentists streamline and empower their practices through the use of information technology. The SCDI develops standards for choosing the hardware, software and digital imaging solutions to create a fully computerized practice.

As the first chairman of the ADA Standards Committee on Dental Informatics, which was formed in 1999, Dr. Ahlstrom brought together dental informatics experts from across the dental profession, representing dentists, government, academia, and industry. He led the group’s successful efforts to develop standards for information exchange, clinical informatics systems and knowledge management. Dr. Ahlstrom served as chairman of the SCDI until 2006.

For application materials for the Robert H. Ahlstrom New Investigator Award, including specific submission requirements for eligibility, and more information about the ADA Standards Programs, please visit ADA.org/dentalstandards.

ADA Council on Scientific Affairs extends application period for John W. Stanford New Investigator Award

The American Dental Association Council on Scientific Affairs is extending the application deadline for the 2014 John W. Stanford New Investigator Award to Oct. 31.

Applications for the Stanford New Investigator Award are accepted annually from dental students or dentists who have earned their D.D.S. or D.M.D. degrees no more than five years prior to the time of selection.

The Stanford New Investigator Award underscores the crucial role that dental standards play in patient health and safety and in the efficacy of dental products.

The award pays homage to the legacy of Dr. Stanford, a 40-year ADA employee who is credited with establishing the ADA’s current standards program.

Submissions must be original research that addresses some aspect of the use of standards in dental research or clinical application.

To apply for the John W. Stanford New Investigator Award ore learn more about the ADA Standards Programs, please visit ADA.org/dentalstandards.

In Zambia, new dentist volunteers to treat patients in a truck

Dr. Rachel Hymes poses with a group of children from Kafue, Zambia where she treated residents through International Caring Hands.

Dr. Rachel Hymes poses with a group of children from Kafue, Zambia where she treated residents through International Caring Hands.

Dr. Rachel Hymes had all the dental equipment she needed — two dental chairs, an air compressor, anesthesia and tools to perform extractions safely — inside a trailer on the back of a truck.

She’d park the vehicle, the size of a large U-Haul truck, on the grounds of the Riverside Farm Institute in Kafue, Zambia and open the mobile mini-clinic every morning. Each day, for nearly week, she saw about 40 patients seeking relief from their dental problems — ranging from large cavities to years old broken teeth.

“I decided to only do extractions,” Dr. Hymes said. “I had to make a decision. I can either serve one person in an hour, or several for one hour. The need was just tremendous.”

Since graduating from the Medical University of South Carolina in 2010, Dr. Hymes has volunteered her dentistry skills for a mission trip every year. This year, she went to Zambia with the group International Caring Hands.

Dr. Hymes found the organization through the ADA International Volunteer website. She chose the group because the mobile clinics are equipped with necessary materials and tools. All she had to do was pay for her flight.

Dr. Hymes, of Mountain City, Tennessee, and her husband, flew out of Charlotte, North Carolina to New York City on June 7. From there, they flew to Dubai and then to Lusaka, the capital of Zambia. There was another two-hour car ride before they arrived in Kafue — 28 hours later.

“It was quite a journey,” she said. They arrived on a Sunday afternoon and began working in the mobile clinic at 8:30 a.m. Monday. Most of the people she saw lived in a village close to the Institute.

Along with a local assistant and a translator, Dr. Hymes opened the clinic until 5:30 p.m. for four days, treating about 150 people of all ages.

Dr. Hymes and her dental assistant Lucas pose with the International Caring Hands' mobile dental clinic.

Dr. Hymes and her dental assistant Lucas pose with the International Caring Hands’ mobile dental clinic.

“Some people were scared. Others didn’t get the idea of being numb,” she said. “But when they were done, they would thank us and give us a hug.”

By the end of my mission, word had started to spread about the clinic and they had to turn a lot of people away.

“That was the hardest part of the trip,” she said. “We had to close even though there was still a line 20 people deep.”

Because of the need, Dr. Hymes said she hopes other dentists, especially new dentists like her, seek out ways to volunteer and use their skills to treat those in need — whether internationally or locally.

“If dentists are available to go, they should do it,” Dr. Hymes said. “(International Caring Hands) had everything a dentist needs to treat patients, all they need are people to do it.”

Dr. Hymes said International Caring Hands provided the food and a place to stay. Meanwhile, their dental equipment was in great condition.

“I enjoy getting to know people and just helping others get some relief from pain,” Dr. Hymes said. “I think as a human being, as a Christian, I feel the responsibility to help those in need. Volunteering is something I hope I can do for the rest of my life.”

At the end of her trip, Dr. Hymes said, they parked the truck in a garage where the mobile clinic will stay until another dentist comes along to volunteer.

For more information on international volunteering, visit the ADA International Volunteer website here.

Get Involved!

Decisions made today may be affecting new dentists and their patients for the next 30 to 40 years.

New dentists everywhere are making their voices heard in the development of policies and programs through involvement in state and local new dentist committees. These committees advocate for the needs, interests and concerns of new dentists. Volunteer leaders help new dentists transition to and succeed in practice as well as develop and offer continuing education, networking opportunities and leadership development.

To get involved with your new dentist committee, contact your state or local dental society, the ADA New Dentist Committee at newdentist@ada.org or 1-312-440-2779.

Institute for Diversity in Leadership project extends dental care to Navajo Nation patients

While working at Tséhootsooi Medical Center, a hospital operated by the Navajo Nation in Fort Defiance, Arizona, Dr. Felicia Frizzell noticed a need: Patients in the Adolescent Care Unit, a psychiatric in-patient area for children ages 13-17, were not receiving basic dental check-up.

“Patients in this unit are given a physical, their eyes and ears are checked, but there is no dental screening,” said Dr. Frizzell, adding that the dental clinic’s only interaction with these patients was in an emergency basis.

Dr. Frizzell

Dr. Frizzell

In addition, as a Mescalero Apache from Mescalero, New Mexico, Dr. Frizzell said she knows all too well that Native Americans often lack dental care.

“I know this population. They’re a very young, vulnerable and a high-risk population for dental problems,” she said.

For those reasons, she chose to work on getting patients from the Adolescent Care Unit access to dental care as her project for the ADA Institute for Diversity in Leadership. Dr. Frizzell was among 12 graduates this year.

The Institute provides a diverse group of dentists with education and experience to build a lifetime of relationships and set new leadership paths within the dental profession and their community. As a key part of the experience, each participant designs and completes a personal leadership project for his or her community or the profession.

“Before the Institute, I tended to be more of an observer,” she said. “I want to be a leader. The Institute helped me to step up, learn to negotiate and boost my confidence.”

To accomplish her project, Dr. Frizzell worked with the hospital’s dental director and colleagues to figure out the logistics and process needed in order to see these patients in the Adolescent Care Unit outside of an emergency setting.

The dental clinic began seeing patients in February, providing care ranging from a basic dental check-up and cleanings to extractions and root canals. For irreversible procedures, the clinic must arrange transportation services for the patient’s parents in order to gain parental consent.

Because each patient cycle in the Adolescent Care Unit is about eight weeks long, about 12-14 new patients receive dental screenings and needed treatment after each cycle. This poses a challenge because many of the patients don’t come to their appointments after they’ve long left the ACU.

“The most difficult part right now, which we’re all still trying to find a solution, is following up on these patients,” she said.

Nonetheless, said Dr. Frizzell, it has been a successful first step and has been good way to introduce the patients to the importance of dental care.

“The kids are great and ask a lot of questions,” she said. “Because some have substance abuse issues, we try to educate how these substances can affect their teeth.”

Dr. Frizzell said she has proposed a hospital policy that, if approved, would ensure her program continues even when she’s no longer at the facility.

“As a new dentist, I want to build up my leadership and team building skills in order to benefit my patients,” she said. “Because of the Institute, I know that if I have a good idea, I can get it done.”

New award to help develop young dental professionals in periodontology

Berlin — Straumann and botiss biomaterials announced Sept. 18 the creation of a new annual award to foster and encourage the development of young dental professionals in the field of periodontal care/dentistry.

The Straumann/botiss biomaterials Young Periodontal Professional of the Year award will be worth 5,000 euros cash prize, along with travel to and participation at the bone and tissue days event of botiss biomaterials.

All dental professionals, including practitioners, hygienists, students and researchers, under the age of 35 may apply for the award. Applications will be in English, presenting original work that contributes to the advancement of periodontal treatment and care. Dissertations, projects or even practical work experience may form the basis of the application.

Further details regarding applications, conditions and rules will be published in due course. The first award will be presented at the bone and tissue days of botiss biomaterials in 2015.

Based in Basel, Switzerland, Straumann is a global manufacturer of dental implants, instruments, prosthetics and tissue regeneration products. Botiss biomaterials, based in Berlin, is a supplier of oral tissue regeneration products.

Have you ever thought about academic dentistry?

For dentists just beginning their dental career, there are a number of opportunities today for volunteer, part-time and full-time opportunities in dental academics.

Dentists seeking information on academic dentistry may find answers from various resources, including TeachDentistry.org, a website developed by faculty at the Columbia University College of Dental Medicine, and a program during ADA 2014 — America’s Dental Meeting in San Antonio.

Any practitioner who is curious about teaching is encouraged to go on the website to answer their questions about teaching and seriously consider contributing to the next generation of colleagues, said Dr. Burton Edelstein, a professor of dental medicine at Columbia University.

In addition, if you are attending ADA 2014 — America’s Dental Meeting in San Antonio, you may be interested in the Saturday, Oct. 11, program titled “Transitioning from Practice to Dental Education.”  To register, click here.

ADA 2014 logoThe program is an opportunity to learn about moving from a career in dental practice to a career in dental education. The program presents a picture of all aspects of academic life, its advantages and disadvantages and its opportunities and challenges.

Three experienced dental educators will present practical information regarding applying for and obtaining an academic appointment: Dr. John N. Williams Jr., dean, Indiana University School of Dentistry; Dr. Diane C. Hoelscher, chair, Department of Patient Management at the University of Detroit Mercy School of Dentistry; and Dr. Brad J. Potter, senior associate dean for academic affairs, University of Colorado School of Dental Medicine.

Plan to attend the New Dentist Reception at ADA 2014 — America’s Dental Meeting

New Dentist Reception at the ADA's 2013 annual meeting in New Orleans.

New Dentist Reception at the ADA’s 2013 annual meeting in New Orleans.

New dentists seeking to connect with their peers and enjoy the big and bold Texas ambiance at the ADA 2014 — America’s Dental Meeting can attend the New Dentist Reception from 5:30-7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 10 at the Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center, Lonesome Dove Room.

ADA 2014 logoDentists who graduated from dental school less than 10 years ago and dental students are invited to attend.

“The New Dentist Reception affords a valuable opportunity for young dentists and dental students to interact at America’s dental meeting,” said Dr. Brian M. Schwab, New Dentist Committee chair. “This is a time and place where younger dentists and students can focus on networking, leadership idea exchange and engagement, and camaraderie during the annual meeting. This sell-out event is also a blast to attend because there is music, food, drinks and fun atmosphere.”

Tickets are required for entry (limit two tickets per person). Those who registered in advance can log back into their registration and print their tickets in the Registration Area in Hall A/B Lobby. Guests must be 21 years old or older. Tickets are $30 per person on-site and can be purchased at the door of the event, which includes food and drinks. The New Dentist Reception is provided by the generous support of Wells Fargo Practice Finance.

Visit ADA.org/meeting to register.

 

 

Curious about group practice models?

New dentists interested in learning more about the changing pattern of oral health care delivery systems should attend the panel discussion, “Understanding Group Practice Models: Each practice model can be a model practice,” at ADA 2014 — America’s Dental Meeting.

ADA 2014 logoAttendees can get first-hand accounts about practice structure, processes and patient care from dentists whose organizations are at the leading edge of group practice. Moderated by Dr. Todd Marshall, Council on Dental Practice member, the panel includes representatives from different classifications of dental group practices as identified by the ADA.

The speakers are:

  • Dr. John E. Gulon, president, Park Dental (dentist-owned and -operated group)
  • Dr. Andrew Matta, founding partner, North American Dental Group; CEO, Professional Dental Alliance, LLC.; chief medical officer, Refresh Dental Management, LLC (dental service organization affiliated group).
  • Dr. Rick Workman, CEO, Heartland Dental Care (dental service organization affiliated group).
  • Dr. John J. Snyder, dental director and CEO, Permanente Dental Associates; board member, Kaiser Center for Health Research (insurer-provider group).
  • Dr. Thomas Veryser, CEO, Michigan Community Dental Clinics, Inc. (nonprofit).
  • Dr. Alan S. Douglas, director, Advanced Education in General Dentistry Residency Program, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, Audie Murphy Memorial Veterans Hospital (government agency group).

A Q&A session will follow the panel presentations.

To attend the course, register at ADA.org/meeting. Course code 6368. The course is free. However, all courses, including free ones, are ticketed. CE hours: 2.5.